About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CNBC 15
KQED (PBS) 4
FBC 3
KQEH (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
KICU 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
convince the american people it would be different this time. >> i will. the worst budget deficit under george bush happened in his last term in office. that's when nancy pelosi was speaker of the house. budget ra $450 billion. president obama blew through those deficits. he had in excess of trillion dollar deficits year after year. what the republicans were able to do in the house is not continue that level of trajectory. has spending gone up? it absolutely has. but the level has slowed down and -- >> i get the feeling, congresswoman, maybe not you in particular, a lot of your party are giving up the fight and keeping the powder dry and hoping at the end of the year pick up more seats in the house and maybe take the senate and you bet you that will be the time when republicans get serious. but is that a lot to hang your hat on? >> well, what we need to hang our hat on is boosting the labor force participation rate. we're at the lowest level ever for anyone over age 16 actually having a job in the labor force and in a full-time capacity. that has to change. and unfortunately the preside
deficit has been cut in half. it allows us to meet our obligations to future generations. from the heard president, deficit picture is looking better. much so that levels will be below where they were before the budget crisis. >> how do republicans react to away from the emphasis on deficit reduction act out >? >> john baeder came out and said that this was the most irresponsible budget yet of the obama has proposed. the president laster put out an all french to republicans and said he was willing to make changes to social security, medicare and other entitlement programs. those are all gone this year. for republicans to look at these budgets in the lines of what the established last year in terms of topline numbers under the agreement, this budget is something that will not move in the house of republicans. are viewed asts more of political documents as opposed to policy proposals. >> that really is right. especially this year. yep midterms coming up in november. the white house wanted to lay out policy priorities going forward to follow through on over the next eight months. the presid
. the white house budget office projects-- the proposals reduce the federal deficit to $564 billion by 20-15--- taking the defict down by about half of what the obama administration inherited. house speaker john boehner criticized the spending increases, and called it the president's "most irresponsible budget yet." radio shack is on shaky ground with investors...the stock fell 17% yesterday after turning in a larger than expected loss for the 4th quarter. the electronics retailer also plans to close up to 1,100 stores. radio shack's ceo admits the company is partly to blame for the dismal holiday earnings. however, he remains confident in the turnaround plan. a week after online exchange mt. gox lost close to a half- billion dollars' worth of bitcoins to hackers, another exchange says the same thing has happened to them flexcoin has shut down, saying that hackers stole all of its bitcoins -- 600-thousand-dollars' worth. these troubles have not negatively affected the value of bitcoins ---just one is still worth about 700-dollars. that price has rallied since the mt gox hack. a judge i
not do nearly enough to tackle the entitlement program. thepoint has been made deficit has come down so much in the short term, and that is true but there was a fiscal problem facing the country. the real problem is the medium and long-term debt. the real problem is dealing with health care, aging population and health reforms. -- let mee ask about ask about the private deck with a tax break the industry has gotten for years. it sounds like both sides ones that do go away. does that mean it will? not think so. far from obvious that both sides want it to go away. speaking fellow republicans. many walked away from that as soon as it came out. carried interest belongs as part of a broader tax reform, but none actually tax it correctly. it withet serious about something with integrity it is just convenient, and that is no way to do tax policy. real,ld do some meaningful tax reform. really hurt his base if he takes on entitlement reform in a way that means cutting entitlements in the future. >> can i say something about that? >> was that my? -- mya? hurting his about base might be true polit
happen to like, is going anywhere. >> what do you like about it? >> the deficit is going down considerably. >> is that from fiscal reform or from the economy growing? >> i think it is both. the sequester, which i did not happen to think is an intelligent approach, has been effective. have beenwe increasing revenue because of the economic recovery and the composition of the recovery. those two things and some others have resulted in the deficit coming down considerably. it is projected at 3.1% of gdp. it is way down. it was over 9%. we should step back and recognize that is good progress. you could debate who is responsible, but it is good progress. second, some of the initiatives, let's just take infrastructure, are so vitally needed. both sides agree, it is just how to pay for it. it is not going anywhere. senator johnson is right. it is an election year. this budget will just sit there and not be acted on. >> senator, you are saying it does not address the big issues, which you mentioned, entitlement spending. there were no big numbers around cutting social security or any o
four years. the bridge district says they need that money to close a growing deficit. those hikes would be incre mental. in april of this year, the toll would go to $7. two years later, 7.25 and then the next year 7.50 and finally $8 in 2015. if you drive and have a fastrack, that will stay in effect for each of the toll hikes. >> still encourage people to use that. >> yes. >>> 7:10. a rather unusual police response after a fatal crash in pittsburg early this morning. mum at 7:30, why cops approached a crash car with their guns drawn on a major roadway. >>> get me out of here. that's what a lot of travel agents are hearing in parts of the nation right now. what's causing this reaction and where everyone is going. >>> good morning. right now we still have very tough conditions for your commute as we look at 280. a lot of standing water. we'll run it down for you, tell you how the drive times are being affected by the storms. >>> no way of getting around it. we're getting blasted. around half moon bay and pacifica heading north towards san francisco there is a really strong cell. we'll ta
. the bridge district says it needs the money to close a growing deficit. for drivers with fast track, the $1 discount will remain in effect for each of the toll hikes. >>> ktvu is proud to sponsor a first-of-its-kind event coming to the bay area. 16,000 students will fill oracle arena in late march to hear celebrity speeches and performances. the event is called we day. you can't buy tickets. the only way for kids to go is to earn a ticket by making a positive difference locally and globally. over the next month, leading up to the big event, we'll be sharing sawyers of children and schools doing just that. today, julie haener takes us to an elementary school on the peninsula. >> i don't think we've talked about how free the children started. >> reporter: at this elementary school in palo alto, the principal is inspiring young minds by encouraging students to get involved in the international charity known as free the children. >> we've been doing a lot of sales like every time we have a playdate, we work on like -- we bake things. >> reporter: students such as sophia and sienna are among tho
it calls a growing infrastructure deficit of crumbling roads, bridges and highways. in a report to congress to the dot says washington needs to spend as much as $146 billion a year to maintain and improve the nation's roads and crossings starting right away. >>> to retail where japan's fast retailing the parent company of unico is in talks to buy jay crew. according to the wall street jourl, j crew's management is seeking $5 billion for the business. but it's unclear whether fast retailing is willing to pay that price in a statement the company says it doesn't comment on market speculation. >>> pier one imports cuts its outlook for the second straight month because of snowed-in shoppers. that is where we begin tonight's market focus. the home furnishings retailer blamed the harsh winter for soft traffic. the company did say it expects business to be normal once the weather gets better. still shares down more than 5.5% today to $18.92. it was the opposite story for 3d systems. the 3d printer maker gave investors a strong outlook, predicting its $1 billion in revenue in 2015. now, this quarte
a current account deficit, whether you are on the production side of commodities or the consumption side of commodities. clearly there are some particularly hard-hit emerging markets leaving the ukraine aside for a moment. you've got the now so-called fragile five, brazil, india, indonesia, south africa and turkey. and those are some of the most beleaguered areas. but there are also going to be some winners. we have a fairly optimistic view on china which is by far the biggest within the emerging markets sphere. >> wish we had more time to explore that with you. liz ann, always a pleasure talking to you. thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. >> liz ann saunders, chief investment strategist at charles schwab. >>> if you're wondering which well-known u.s. companies have some of the biggest exposure, among them are general motors. it makes about 100,000 cars a year at a plant near st. petersburg and it's hoping to expand operations next year. ford operates three plants with a russian automaker. exxon mobile formed an alliance with russia's state-owned oil company in 2011 exploring for oi
the deficit sharply. that will end the corrupt subsidies to the coal and gas sector. >> where does this leave the eu? this is a country that if it were to become part of the eu would be bringing on a whole a lot of problems. it is effectively another grease type situation in terms of being in debt. eu'soes that leave the feeling toward ukraine knowing if they were to welcome them in, they would be taking on most -- a host of economic problems. ? one of the wings to bear in mind -- one of the things to bear in mind is that the ukraine is split between the east and west. many people in the west are pro-europe and those in the east are more pro-russia. i think we will have to wait to see what happens with the new government and whether they can forge a national unity before we can start talking about what this will mean for europe. >> thank you very much for joining us and we will continue checking in throughout the day. x and the senior fellow at the peterson institute in washington, d.c. you are looking at a live shot of the deposed ukrainian vichdent victor yanuoklo holding a press conference
spending. we've gone from deficits to surpluses. we're growing jobs, growing our economy. we're providing once again sources of energy from whatever source it might be, depending upon which state you're in. we're proving these things do work. but we also told him the time it takes to get permits, we would like to have offshore drilling. we would like to have more cooperation from the epa and different federal regulatory entities that take so long to get through. those things are holding jobs back. of course, he has a different philosophy, that the more government spends, the more it will help the economy, which we believe differently. we believe you let people keep more of their hard earned money they're going to spend it back in the economy and create jobs and businesses. >> congress at budget office, nonpartisan, has come out with a study in the last week or so that says basically obamacare is going to cost up to 2.5 million jobs, lost jobs from obamacare, and about 1 million lost jobs in the minimum wage. question, if you know -- if you knew as governor, if your budget bureau told you
're right, there are issues out there. i think it's more about deficit spending where they'll try to earn -- try to get janet yellen to see how far she'll go politically. greenspan a little bit more of a political animal. ben bernanke saying we'll not weigh in on that stuff and we don't know where janet yellen comes down, and saying do you know what, you need to bring down the deficits, how you do it is your problem. >> it raises questions about unemployment. that's the sticking point. that's what investors and traders want to hear from her, the whole issue of forward guidance. if you were still there, what would you recommend? how would you switch policy to get away from the 6 1/2 percent unemployment threshold? >> they've been burned. no other way to put it they've been burned on the 6.5% marker, whatever you want to call it, threshold and they'll back away from that. i would think that janet yellen would want to make maximum use of what will be a honeymoon period. i don't think that anybody is going to be going really after her hard. it's too early to do that. and there's nothing reall
that is buried and driving me crazy which is the decline in the deficit. nobody wants to hear anything about it, because it went from the trillions and you know the president could say we have cut spending here, and maybe because of the gridlock, but there is not a lot of supply of bonds. how about saying that. >> well, there is a decline in the deficit, but i don't know how much of that s is due to th proceeds of fannie mae and freddie mac. >> and the fdic had a good trade in there. good trading by them. >> and we have not talked about it often enough, but we have talked about the lawsuit initiate initiated by perry and berkowitz and ackman owning the common which is up sharply, but they are way past paying them back. and the president -- >> and the president has said that the common -- >> and the third amendment is all in place meaning that all of the profits are e sweeping to the government helping the e deficit. >> it is a windfall due to the rising pricing in housing, but the president said that the common should go to the treasury and he made that statement, and the fdic knew that the pre
the days of roman empire. its budget deficit is more than a billion dollars. that is the problem. local officials are pleading for a bailout. the country has other problems. the unemployment rate is highest ever, 13%. landing in south korea where the pastor of the world's largest church has been convicted embezzling $12 million. come on. his megachurch congregation top as million worshipers. each church has rows of atm machines in the hallway. that was dead give away something afoot. he has been given a three-year suspended prison sentence and will mead to pay $5 million in fines. >>> do you ever have too much money? i don't think so. don king doesn't. we'll ask him during the break. we'll be right back. in the new new york, we don't back down. we only know one direction: up so we're up early. up late. thinking up game-changing ideas, like this: dozens of tax free zones across new yk state. move here. expand here. or start a new business here... and pay no tax for 10 years. with new jobs, new opportunities and a new tax free plan. there's only one way for your business to go. up. find o
term on trying to boost job growth. over the ten-year window you will see steadily declining deficits. at the end the period i think you'll see a declining debt-to-gdp ratio. that's the right trajectory. >> yesterday we had warren buffett on the program. he said he thinks the proposal would be to boost the earned income tax credit even more, expand that in a bigger way. that's a way to boost wages for people that are working without looking at job losses by raising the minimum wage. how about offering it to a wider variety of people and taking the minimum wage proposal off the table? >> these things are not mutually exclusive. there's no reason you can't work at both ends here. >> is it something you would offer if you did a broad -- not what you're talking about right now, but boosting the income tax credit in a big way, offering it across the aisle as a way of finding compromise, in instead of looking at one from another. i think that would be something republicans would take on heartily. >> we're willing to consider any ideas republicans put on the table. the president is putting t
has about a $20 billion deficit in energy. most of that comes from russia. one of the main aims -- >> does ukraine have its own domestic sources of energy? >> not much. >> it could. it?x'eeds to be developed. >> i just read a story where that gas company is going to be pulling back, part of their effort to diversify. they tried to do that. one of the aims of western reform will be to get rid of the domestic fuel subsidies, bring it up to a more western level. what does that mean? it means helping pay the bills of average ukrainians. that bill is from russia. if it's rubles or -- no matter how many consonants are in the currency it's still fungible. >> they are in arears by more than $1.5 billion. that first payment goes directly to gas. >> let's talk about another couple stories on your beats. first with you and china, and you maintain that possibly, possibly china is facing a bear stearns kind of moment. >> the first corporate bond defaults in chinese modern history. remember, they didn't issue corporate bonds for a long time because they were communist. there were no corporate
that get talked about was the significance reduction in the deficit that comes from passing the farm bill. and i wish we could do immigration because there is another $58 billion to be saved it if we were to pass the immigration bill. so all of these bills are not just bills to deal with an apparent problem, but also have tremendous positive impact on our economy and senator reid is correct, if he could get that money, we've already passed the farm bill, so that money is there and it could be used to offset whatever the costs would be to unemployment. though i don't believe you ought to do that. this is an emergency. you ought to treat it as an emergency and not worry about finding a way to pay for it at this particular jupncture. >> dent partment of health and human services has told americans if they like their health insurance, they can keep it another two years. affordable care act compliance is being changed, be extended. doesn't this cut to the spirit of the what you and break it dolaw and break it down is this one rope we passed health care is to get standards in the insurance indu
progress made. if we just take a year in review. so, a year in review, in terms of deficit reductions. when the budget came out last year, it was predicted $1.1 trillion. it was 680 in the end. about a $400 billion deficit reduction from 2012 to 2013. then, we have a situation where i think hopefully we've broken the fever on the issues of having conversations about default. >> money that's overseas. are there efforts to bring money overseas permanently back to the states? >> it depends on how one is talking about that. we want to create a system that is clear and that is helpful for our companies to know what they're doing, how they're doing. and not discourage investments from coming back and finances from coming back to the u.s. >> tell me about going from bettenville, arkansas, in the private sector, back to the government. >> walmart is an institution of execution. that is what it is certainly known for. and fortunate to spend time and to be there. coming back to the federal government, certainly, as you reflected, one has to work and work on both sides of the aisle. i go up and down t
of the deficit. if there are things we can do in the administration, the old politics over policy, i think certainly in energy, certainly in several other key areas if we had a better view on policy versus politics, i think we'd see some more robustness. you look at the jobs that are created out of energy and the fracking business, you know, the average employee in theรง marcellus, $95,000 a year. 1.3 million jobs, $63 billion in additional tacks. energy independence is at the heart of getting this gdp up and running. >> growth cures all evil. it's great to see you. >> thank you for the opportunity. >> really appreciate it. >>> we have some breaking news now. bertha coombs, what can you tell us? >> the white house says it's going to allow -- to extend the current customers in the transitional plan yaal plans fo two years. 1.5 million individuals and small businesses. they will be renewable through 2016. also boosting 2015 deductibles and out of pocket costs by 4% and they're extending the open enrollment period for an extra month next year to february 15th. now, the white house deflected
the nucleus to correct from deficits for tell burterrible illnesses to pt blindness in the third person providing that healthy dna. all the characteristics of what may be a person of than an illness are conveyed by the biological parents. i don't have a problem with that. if all you are donating is the healthy environment in which the traits that belong to two biological parents are to grow, that seems okay to me. stuart: it will be taking a bit further, won't it? you are getting designer babies. >> now allow anonymous and oregon donation. it deprives the offspring of knowing their biological parents. will not even consider this. donate or over him. so is a kid doesn't know who the dad or mom is. what o you need to know that for? it is the key to who you are spiritually, medically. stuart: i am with you all the way. i'm not sure i see a way of banning it and stopping it when it gets to that kind of situation. how do you stop that? i'm going to touch on one of your favorite subjects. social media apps. you are not a fan of social media, but in this case social media is organizing tyrus.
deficit issues. the need for sustainable fiscal path through the country to focus to the maximum extent possible on fiscal changes that would address the longer run issues that will be associated ratio rising debt to gdp over decades and to try to avoid doing harm to the recovery. i would take the same general position. a in the short run, there is value of additional physical stimulation in the economy that will complement what you are already doing and make it easier to withdraw the quantitative easing. is that a fair comment? >> i do think the economy is beginning to recover and we have made progress. minimum i would hope that fiscal policy would do no harm. >> one quick question. you and your predecessors have looked at the unemployment rate of 6.5% as a point of inflection if you will. one of the aspects of the labort situation is that participation is falling. that 6.5% might not actually capture the reality of the current economy. to be an adequate measure of undertakeeds to do to monetary easing. are you looking at other ways or looking beyond this unemployment rate to gauge you
would happen with the $17 trillion deficit? stuart: we have asked you this before. what are we going to do? you told us you are out there, we want to bring people together. not looking for a radical opposite to what is going on. you want to bring people together to find solutions and i know you have been out there looking. do you think it is possible to establish a consensus? is it possible to bring people together over a course of action that will take us in a different direction in the future? >> it is very possible. we need to start talking. never have a conversation with your adversary because that humanizes them and your job is to demonize the. we see a lot of that going on. that is not what we want. in the pre revolutionary days of america people need to get together with their friends and family and talk about what kind of america do you want to have? talk about who your representatives are and how did they vote. not how they said they voted but how did they vote. you need to know that because you need to talk to your 87-year-old and who hasn't voted in 20 years who may be an
, imbalances you have because of the current account deficits, you need to keep monitoring fiscal policy quite tight. you have to be a lot deeper into the upcoming fiscal year before you see contraction growth and that has to come on the back of implementation of projects, some of the economic reform issues that have been announced since may 2012. >> so i guess may is the key if we're looking for measures like this to be introduced. do you think that's going to be a turning point for the country? >> well, i think there's a few questions about will the government get enough of the mandate and therefore be able to, on the back of that, implement policies, but that remain toes be seen. so it might not be easy for some of the incumbent parties to necessarily muster the vote they need to have. but it's true, post elections, you know, in principal we should be more a possibility to get more on the petition side of these policies, let preoccupation with elections nearing, if you will. the kick start of the investment cycle, all of that cannot be turned on overnight. it takes a while before these type
remained overvalued despite an account deficit. >> reporter: the debt of the country has been falling, though, as a result, yields have been rising. they're not worried you're not going to be able to reservice it. are you worried about a restructuring? >> we are not worried, but ukraine needs external help for the next year or two. i think with sensible economic policies and with international support from the imf, u.s. and the eu, we can return to the market back within six months, maximum. >> reporter: if you listen to a discussion about ukraine and the united states, it's all about this is the eu or russia, a forced choice, some kind of big monumental decision for ukraine. do you see it so divided, choosing between eu and russia? >> ukrainians would not want to make it look like this. it wants help from all of its neighbors including russia and on the other side, but the majority of the population definitely supports european standards of business, democracy, free market economy. >> reporter: thanks so much for joining us, mr. fiala. we really appreciate it. tomas fiala, ceo of dra
so we expect the lira, the current deficit is an issue in turkey and we expect the currency to remain weak so we have to consider that when making investment proposals, we have to assume a little bit of, not a currency strengthening anyway, probably weakening if anything and brazil is a problem for currency from that point of view and equally as a sterling uk investor we find the dollar quite cheap so we find u.s. assets quite interesting at the moment. what goes around comes around i guess. >> reporter: thank you very much for joining us. julia, that is from here. we'll be back in an hour with another interview. for now pack over to you. >> thank you, great to chat to you. >>> the bitcoin exchange mt. gox received a subpoena from prosecutors in new york, asked the company to preserve certain documents. ceo mark capellas issued a statement saying the business is at a turning point. japanese authorities are looking into the matter but don't have jurisdiction after the mt. gox website went down. >>> still to come, the british economy returns to focus as investors await the second meetin
that had obviously unsustainable balance of payment situations and that had current account deficits and that needed to have some kind of sell-off to rebalance and other countries where the fundamentals were fine. frankly, it seems like those fears weren't born out. i'm wondering what you think of the dynamic now give whatn what happening and in particular whether or not you think that this is going to have contagion effects elsewhere. >> this is an important question. the emerging markets are in the middle of a major capital outflow. i think some of the data shows that there's been money leaving emerging markets for over 15 weeks already now. >> 18. >> 18 weeks. and i think that we shouldn't expect this to change the matters very much. i think rebecca's question was spot on. how much has the russian action over the weekend really changed the macroeconomic situation and i think very little. i think that applies to the emerging markets as an asset class as well. >> but let me say something. it hasn't changed the macrosituation but it has changed the approach to risk. look what's going
't have enough import to fund our consumption or enough saving to support our deficit. what are we going to do if china changes and we don't. >> but i gather that you think they're on the ascendency and we are clearly on the decline. that is the -- i will say, that was my takeaway. >> they are rebalancing their model to keep the growth and development story going and that will certainly take them to a larger scale of their economy than ours, at some point in the next five to ten years. >> gdp. >> their per capta gdp, joe, is going to be increasing, but at a much slower pace. for a long time. >> multiplied out and that's why it's bigger. >> for a long time. are we on the decline? that's the big debate in america. we continue to undersave, underinvest in people, infrastructure, and capacity. and if we don't get that together, then their ascendency will coincide with our decline. >> we've had periods like this before. >> yeah. >> i mean, you're optimistic we get it together or do you think we're the roman empire? >> no, look, i hope we get it together. what i don't see is a debate on the st
to have it happen during -- when things were terrible five years ago. but we can have a deficit which creates more debt but not at a rate that this grows faster than gdp grows. if gdp is going to grow at 2% in real terms, but the fed has a policy that they're shooting for 2% inflation on top of that, that would mean 4% in terms of nominal gdp and you literally could have debt grow at 4% and it would maintain the same relationship to no, ma'amal gdp as it does now. the trend is wrong. there is a danger of that goes wrong. i don't like seeing it go up as a percentage of gdp. this country is in wonderful shape. >> if you say government pensions aren't the problem because the government has the power to tax, what do you say to somebody who has a private pension? should they be worried about it? should they think they are still going to get it when they retire. >> it's protected by the pension benefit guarantee corps. that has come into play in many pension plans. the state municipal pension plans, the one right here in omaha, is in terrible shape. and almost out of resources. it's a healt
that the deficit is going down. who wouldn't hope for that? we hope for it. it's working. but any time you look at what they're doing, it's all short term. the stuff that's going to eat our lunch is 10,000 people a day turning 65. you've got a system that was set up of social security that you won't even address the insolvency of it for 75 years. health care is on automatic pilot. forget what you call it. it's time to deal with the long-term stuff before interest goes from where it is now to back to historical heights and then watch people grab their socks and run for blocks. >> is there anything you think can be done considering that it probably won't be implemented until after the november 2014 midterms? >> anything that will be done will be done down the road. that's what's wrong with the health care plan. whatever it is is all the correction process is down the road, way ahead. and it's like a dock fix. you're going to do another dock fix and they will run in. you're going to do anything. whatever you do, whether it's tort reform or real estate or whatever is done, the groups will organize
talk about deficits and debt. we could talk about data. but in the end, treasuries really when it gets nasty, when that tina the only -- that there is no alternative to stocks, that changes rather abruptly when stocks go down. and then tina becomes there is no alternative to being long treasuries. we want to keep cognizant of that. to the end the japanese are doing everything in their power to keep the yen weak, let's look at how all that stimulus and various ways they're trying to goose their economy have panned out. one way they've made good strides on. currently the latest reads is 3.7. now, that is the basic lowest rates since july of '07. during that interim period between '07 and now the high was 5.5. the message to this is is that the japanese may have issues for the last 25 years. but huge high unemployment certainly does not seem to be one of them but they made some inroads. base wage, recent data. this is important. base wages were only up 1/10 year over year. one of the things they're trying to do is goose inflation. if you adjust the wages for inflatio
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)